Bernadette Y. Connor

Bernadette Y. Connor is a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She was born at home in a one-room apartment in North Philadelphia; the fourth of five children. To help her family financially, she sang rhythm and blues in many of the local nightclubs until she graduated from Dobbins Vocational Area High School in 1969 and was hired as a secretary by Sun Oil Company.

Her first love was music, but she found herself writing poetry in Junior High School. Some of her earliest writings were published in SCLC monthly magazine. Both singing and writing had to take a back burner to caring for her family, but midnight often found her doodling. A divorced mother of three, Bernadette saw that all of her children graduated from college.

She found her niche’ at AT&T as a communications technician. With the merger came a lay-off and she saw as an opportunity to begin a new career, but that was put on hold by a series of medical problems and finally the devastation of the brutal murder of her eldest son on Christmas Eve of 1991. Her zest for life, travel and adventure were nearly extinguished. However, Bernadette’s thoughts slowly returned to writing.

The literary fire was stoked by reacquainting herself with her earlier poems, and Bernadette embarked on yet another adventure. She wrote a simple love story called ‘Finally’ that opened the gate to an avalanche of works which include 13 novels and 12 screenplays.

Bernadette’s published debut novel, ‘Damaged’, the first psychological thriller ever written and published by an African American garnered her a spot in “Who’s Who In America 2004”. Publishers Weekly dubbed her the “genre-crossing writer” and she loves the distinction. Agent, Mondella Jones, labeled her “a master storyteller.”

Featured Selection

Limpin by Bernadette Y. Connor

If you ain’t got love you’re . . . LIMPIM. Ida Evers shares all of the trials and victories of their lives together, with her husband, James Evers, who has Alzheimer’s. His reactions are hilarious and heartwarming. Her gripping storytelling is filled with all of the angst, surprise, joy and loss of lives lived thoroughly with love as its anchor. Tales of family life will come and go, but you will never forget the Evers.

Book Review: Limpin is a well told, very interesting fictional African American family drama.

The book opens with this; “The doctor told me James had Alzheimer’s four years ago, and that he would forget things and do strange things he had never done before. I thought that diagnosis was funny at the time because corn liquor had been doing that to James for over fifty years. As far as James doing anything he had never done before, I thought that impossible. If he got his back up about something or a load on, James always could and would do some pretty stupid things.”

This book reminds me of the book/movie ‘The Notebook’. It is a love story that goes beyond the love between husband and wife to encompass the love and dynamics between family members.

Author Bernadette Y. Connor uses her main character Mrs. Ida Evers to share this heartwarming story where love anchors their lives through it all, especially towards to end when Alzheimer’s works to rob her husband James of his memories.

Here is a quote from chapter 19: “The summer of forty-eight. What can’t be said about it? The most profound phrase that comes to mind is, ‘I wasn’t in Gadsden.’ We experienced unbelievable highs and devastating lows. It seemed as if I would at long last get to know a loving relationship with my husband. We could have that honeymoon I read about other people having and enjoying so much. Oh, James, we came so close to having all of that, and so much more.

We drove up to Virginia Beach the first weekend we were alone. I saw the ocean for the very first time in my life.  It was truly a grand sight too. It stretched to forever; all blue and green with white foam smashing against the dark tan colored beach. You told me that the sand was mixed with dirt and that the farther down the coast you went the brighter it got and that there were actually white beaches in Florida and Mexico.

Born and raised colored in the south the trip was a rude awakening for me. We all knew our boundaries and basically stayed within them. Every once in a while, someone would get rambunctious and find out the hard way that white folks don’t play with you. The way I saw it at the time, white folks were the least of my problems because I dealt so little with them.”

You will have to read this book to understand this reference: “I wasn’t in Gadsden”.

I, Theodocia McLean endorse Limpin by Bernadette Y. Connor as a family drama that shines the light on love vs control. I purchased this book from Kindle and completed this review on November 6, 2017.

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Author’s Books

Awards and Recognition

Author Spotlight
Book Spotlight/Review For He’s Mine
Book Spotlight/Review For Limpin

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Amazon Author’s Page

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Cold Coffee Café

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