Mercedes Rochelle

Born in St. Louis MO with a degree from University of Missouri, Mercedes Rochelle learned about living history as a re-enactor and has been enamored with historical fiction ever since.

A move to New York to do research and two careers ensued, but writing fiction remains her primary vocation.

She lives in Sergeantsville, NJ with her husband in a log home they had built themselves.

Featured Selection

Fatal Rivalry: Part Three of The Last Great Saxon Earls – by Mercedes Rochelle

In 1066, the rivalry between two brothers brought England to its knees. When Duke William of Normandy landed at Pevensey on September 28, 1066, no one was there to resist him. King Harold Godwineson was in the north, fighting his brother Tostig and a fierce Viking invasion. How could this have happened? Why would Tostig turn traitor to wreak revenge on his brother?

The Sons of Godwine were not always enemies. It took a massive Northumbrian uprising to tear them apart, making Tostig an exile and Harold his sworn enemy. And when 1066 came to an end, all the Godwinesons were dead except one: Wulfnoth, hostage in Normandy. For two generations, Godwine and his sons were a mighty force, but their power faded away as the Anglo-Saxon era came to a close.

Customer Book Review: A Great End To A Fascinating Trilogy
Review by Helen Son: March 4, 2017

“This is the final novel in Mercedes Rochelle’s Last Great Saxon Earls trilogy, completing the story begun in Godwine Kingmaker and The Sons of Godwine and describing the events leading up to the Battle of Hastings in 1066.

As the novel opens in 1064, Edward the Confessor is still on the throne of England, but the question of his successor is on everybody’s minds. Harold, Earl of Wessex and brother of Edward’s wife Editha, has recently returned from Normandy, where he was made to swear an oath to support the claim of Duke William – not an oath Harold will keep, because he believes there is a better candidate for the throne: himself. History tells us that Harold will become king in 1066, only to be defeated by William at Hastings just a few months later. Fatal Rivalry explores one theory as to why things went so disastrously wrong.

In The Sons of Godwine, we saw how Harold and his younger brother Tostig had been rivals since they were children; in this book the rivalry intensifies. Believing that his brother has betrayed him, Tostig searches for new alliances overseas, finally joining forces with the Norwegian king, Harald Hardrada, and setting in motion a chain of events which contribute to Harold’s downfall.

Fatal Rivalry is an interesting read and probably my favourite of the three books in this trilogy. Like the previous novel, this one is presented as the memoirs of the Godwineson brothers, with each one given a chance to narrate his own parts of the story. We hear from Leofwine, Gyrth and Wulfnoth, but understandably, it’s Harold and Tostig who get most of the attention. I’ve never read about Tostig in this much depth before and I did have some sympathy for him. Because the novel covers a relatively short period of time, it allows the author to go into a lot of detail in exploring the relationship between Harold and Tostig, the motivation behind their actions and how their rivalry could have been the reason why Harold was fighting a battle in the north of the country when William invaded from the south.

I think the Norman Conquest is fascinating to read about and, like many periods of history, there is so much left open to interpretation and debate. I will continue to look for more fiction set in this period and will also be interested to see what Mercedes Rochelle writes about next.”

Genre: Literature & Fiction, Historical Fiction

Amazon Customer Reviews

amazon-button.fwkindle-button.fw

Author’s Books (Click Covers)

Website & Related Links

Amazon Author’s Page
Author’s Website Link
Author’s Blog Link
Face Book Link
Twitter Link
Google Plus Link
Cold Coffee Café